Russ Roberts

Extras Podcast Episodes and Extras

Category Archive with 65 podcast episodes and extras
 

If a nation sends all its children to school, can it count on greater economic growth? Does putting bottoms in seats generate human capital? This week, Russ welcomed back the Hoover Institution's Eric Hanushek.

What did you think of this week's episode? What did it make you think more about? Share with us your thoughts and reactions, helping us make EconTalk ever better. As always, we learn from you and we love to hear from you.

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1. What additional question(s) would you have asked Hanushek?

2. Hanushek suggests a causal relationship between academic achievement and economic growth in a nation, What is the nature of Russ's concern about "reverse causation?" To what extent do you find Hanushek's claim plausible?

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If the Magna Carta sowed the seeds of freedom and prosperity 800 years ago, what should we look forward to in the next 800 years? This week's episode, recorded before a live audience at the Hoover Institution, asks three EconTalk favorites to offer their thoughts.

And now it's time to share yours. Are you more of an optimist or pessimist about the future of freedom? Help us continue the conversation.

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1. After listening to the opening statements of each guest, which guest do you find most compelling? Explain.

2. The speakers were critical of the role of regulation or the size of government in holding back the US economy. Yet as Russ Roberts pointed out, the economy has grown fairly steadily in the post-WWII United States. How might defenders of regulation or those who support larger government answer critics of regulation and the growth of government?

3. If you had been a member of the live audience, what would you have asked during the Q&A? (Please note if your question would be a general one or directed to a particular speaker.)

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Can economists save lives? It seems Nobel laureate Alvin Roth can...In this week's episode, Roth talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about matching markets and social support for markets. The conversation ranges over indirect kidney donations, (public) school choice, financial market trading, and more.

As always, we'd like to take this chance to enrich the experience of this week's conversation. Use the prompts below to respond in the comments, and use them to spark you own conversations offline. We love to hear from you!

1. What were your top takeaways from this week's episode?

2. Roth asserts that in matching markets, prices function differently than they do in commodities markets? How would you describe this difference?

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Denier? Lukewarmer? Alarmist? Why so many pejorative descriptors for those engaging in conversation about climate change? This is among the questions explored in this week's EconTalk episode with with Matt Ridley.

Now we'd like to continue a civil conversation on this important issue. Please use the prompts below as conversational sparks, and share your reactions in the Comments. As always, we love to hear from you.

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Is it possible that what we though we knew about Africa's stagnant economy is wrong? Do we need a more stylized economic history? If so, this week's guest, Morten Jerven may be the one to provide it.

Let's hear what you took away from this week's conversation. Share your thoughts with us, and let's continue our education together. Africa2.jpg

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

Go Hollywood this week as Russ chats with Adam Davidson of Planet Money, who recently served as technical advisor on the upcoming film The Big Short.

We hope you're looking forward to the film, too. In the meantime, help us continue to expand our learning and conversation at EconTalk, using the prompts below.

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Is climate change the ultimate Black Swan? Harvard's Martin Weitzman joined Russ this week to talk about the potential risks of rising CO2 levels and what policies might be appropriate as a response.

Here are questions for thinking about this week's episode. We feel to respond in the comments making EconTalk more useful to our audience.

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What's the track record of multi-billion dollar projects affecting the lives of millions of people? Surprisingly poor according to this week's guest, Oxford University''s Bent Flyvbjerg this week on such megaprojects. Now we'd like to hear about what you took away from this week's episode. Share your thoughts with us in the Comments, and share these discussion questions over dinner. Either way, we love to hear from you!

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

Did an 800 year old piece of parchment really change the world? That was the central question of this week's episode with Nicholas Vincent.

Now we want to turn the conversation over to you. Use the thought prompts below to carry on the conversation in the Comments. (And we hope you spark some off-line conversation of your own, too!) You never know...your Comment could be featured in an upcoming EconTalk post!
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There's a healthcare revolution underway, and while your smartphone may be center-stage in this drama, there's more to the story than apps. Eric Topol of the Scripps Translational Science Institute joins EconTalk host Russ Roberts for this week's conversation.

Now we'd like to hear from you. Please respond to any of the following in the Comments. Reach out to your friends, too, and let's all continue the conversation.

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This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts interviewed Michael O'Hare on the somewhat mysterious world of art museums and the way their visitors experience art there.

As always, we'd like to hear what you took from this week's conversation, and to continue our own conversation here.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

This week EconTalk host Russ Roberts spoke with Leonard Wong, research professor at the U.S. Army War College, about the honesty and ethics among officers complying with various reporting and training requirements.

We want to hear your thoughts on the tension between regulatory requirements and honesty, in the military and elsewhere. Use the prompts below as conversation starters, and please share your thoughts in the Comments. We love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

EconLog's Scott Sumner argues in this week's episode that too many people reason (incorrectly) from a price change, causing confusion about the factors behind today's continuing low interest rates. The conversation also touches on the role of the Federal Reserve and its monetary policy, and the effects of regulation on issues such as inequality.

Now we'd like to hear from you. Use the prompts below to spark conversation in your classroom or at the dinner table. Or simply use them to help further your own understanding. However you use them, we'd love to hear about it in the Comments.

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This week's guest, Phil Rosenzweig joined EconTalk host Russ Roberts to talk about his new book, Left Brain, Right Stuff.

We'd like to know what you took away from this week's recorded conversation, and hopefully spark some more here online. Use the prompts below, and share your thoughts in the Comments. We love to hear from you.


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This week's episode was recorded and filmed last month before a large crowd at Ball State University. EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomed philosopher James Otteson and Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith to talk about another famous Smith...

For this special episode, we'd like to again give you a chance to see your response on EconTalk. Choose one of the prompts below, and submit your response (500 words or less, please) via email to mail@econtalk.org by midnight EST on Sunday, April 12.

[Video below the fold.]

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This week's episode, garnering a PG-13 rating from Roberts, was a fascinating look inside the formal and informal governance structures of America's prisons with guest David Skarbek.

As always, we'd like to continue learning from and conversing with one another. Have a look at the prompts below, and share your response in the Comments. Thanks for listening; we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Extras

   

In this week's episode, EconTalk host Russ Roberts sat down with Duke University's Campbell Harvey to discuss his research on various investment strategies.

Here are some follow-up questions--please share your response in the Comments. We love to hear from you, and as always, please help us continue the conversation.

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CATEGORIES: Data and Evidence , Extras , Finance

   

We hope you enjoyed this week's conversation with Paul Romer of New York University and director of NYU's Marron Institute of Urban Management. And now we'd like to hear what you got out of it, and for you to help us continue our conversation.

Have a look at the prompts below and share your response in the comments. We look forward to the interaction.

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Growth

   

This week's episode was recorded before a live audience at the Cato Institute and featured GMU economist Lawrence White. The focus of the conversation was a new book edited by White offering suggestions for reform of the U.S. monetary system. As always, we'd like to hear your responses. Please help us continue our conversation in the comments.

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Join our streaming broadcast direct from Ball State University, 5:00-6:30 pm (EST) Wednesday, March 11th! The event will feature a conversation between Russ Roberts, host of EconTalk, James Otteson of Wake Forest University, and Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith of Chapman University, discussing the relevance of Adam Smith for the 21st century.

Please note: We recommend utilizing Firefox for best viewing of the stream.

We will also be releasing audio and video as a regular EconTalk episode in a few weeks.

Addendum: The audio and video are now available at http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2015/04/vernon_smith_an.html

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CATEGORIES: Adam Smith , Extras

   

Continuing Education... David Zetland on Water

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

We hope you enjoyed this week's episode on the pricing and availability of water with David Zetland. As always, we'd like to hear what you got out of it, and for you to help us continue our conversation.

Have a look at the prompts below and share your response in the comments. We look forward to the interaction.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Environment , Extras

   

Steil Follow-up

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

I want to thank everyone who responded to the Benn Steil continuing education post. Most of the responses were related to the question about war's impact on GDP and why I thought war was bad for the economy even though it boosts GDP.

Listener/reader David Hurwitz did a nice job on these topics. He wrote:

Wartime spending meant less of everything consumers would want like cars, refrigerators, more housing square feet per person, etc. Thus in a real sense, the economy is worse off in terms of both production goods that exist in the world, and net global economic capability as a consequence of the destruction. Production to replace the destruction of war only means time is wasted to get back to where one was before. Those that died or were physically or spiritually maimed don't show up in such calculations.

Such thinking means for one thing that poor thinkers would see the horrible effects of war as a solution to some future mess that leaders brought on the world.

People are not better off when their GDP is higher if a large enough part of the rise is the cost of weapons that were not deemed necessary or desirable before the war.

He then added:

Seeing something as having good attributes that don't exist creates false signals which leads to pressure in the direction of achieving that erroneously identified good.

Exactly. When we talk about benefits of war, we encourage war. Sometimes war is necessary. But there's no reason to think that it has a silver lining of creating economic prosperity.

I encourage everyone to go back and listen to this EconTalk episode with Robert Higgs and to read his work on the true state of the economy during WWII. And watch the Keynes-Hayek rap Fight of the Century for another treatment of these issues.

CATEGORIES: Extras

   

Last year's most popular guest, Duke University's Mike Munger, was back on EconTalk this week, discussing the process of choosing in groups.

Their conversation ranged from Odysseus to the Lewis and Clark expedition, and more. Now it's your turn...Choose one of the questions below and submit your reply via email to mail@econtalk.org by midnight on Monday. Some of the responses will again be highlighted in our follow-up.

Thanks for helping us continue the conversation.

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Your Favorite Episodes of 2014

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

I want to thank everyone who completed the survey--almost 1200 people responded from over 60 countries. Here are the top ten episodes of 2014 as voted by you. Every episode got at least 3% of the vote. The top episode got 25%. I especially want to thank you for your comments. Your interest in EconTalk and your appreciation for our efforts is deeply satisfying to me. I hope 2015 can be even better as we try to add ways for you to deepen your learning if that interests you.

1. Michael Munger on the Sharing Economy
2. Marc Andreessen on Venture Capital and the Digital Future
3. Bryan Caplan on College, Signaling and Human Capital
4. Russ Roberts and Mike Munger on How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life
5. Sam Altman on Start-ups, Venture Capital, and the Y Combinator
6. Nina Munk on Poverty, Development, and the Idealist
7. D. G. Myers on Cancer, Dying, and Living
8. Daron Acemoglu on Inequality, Institutions, and Piketty
9. William Easterly on the Tyranny of Experts
10. Jonathan Haidt on the Righteous Mind
10. Thomas Piketty on Inequality and Capital in the 21st Century

CATEGORIES: Extras , Favorites

   

The Council on Foreign Relation's Benn Steill was Russ Roberts's guest this week on EconTalk, where the conversation ranged from Soviet spies to anti-Semitism and imperialism to international power grabs galore.

Now we'd like to hear from you, and take this week's conversation a bit deeper. Choose one of the prompts below and submit your reply (250 words or less, please) via email to mail@econtalk.org by midnight on Monday.

And again, special congratulations to listeners Rick and Warren, whose responses Roberts used in his follow-up to last week's episode with Daniel Sumner.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Extras , History

   

Sumner Follow-up

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

The Continuing Education entry for last week's episode with Dan Sumner asked the following two questions for you to respond to:

1. Mancur Olsen and Gary Becker argue that small groups have greater political power than larger ones, which seems counter-intuitive, as they would muster less influence (fewer votes and less money). Explain why it would be the case that their political influence would increase. Roberts notes that over recent decades, the agriculture industry has become increasingly concentrated into smaller number but larger firms. To what extent has this borne out Olsen and Becker? What does this suggest about the political power of agriculture going forward?

2. How do crop insurance programs differ from direct payment subsidies, according to Sumner? How do the effects (intended and unintended) of each type of program compare? What was Greg Page's case for his support of the switch in the 2014 farm bill from the latter to the former. What do you think Sumner would say in response to Page about which is preferable?

Everyone chose the first question--why are small interest groups relatively powerful. You'd think they'd be irrelevant. They have fewer votes to offer and potentially less money.

Rick Groves got off on the right track when he noted:

Invariably, the interests of larger groups are more complex, nuanced, and diffuse. Small groups can sustain a clear, consistent set of requests that can be addressed directly and engaged with more reliably.
A listener named Warren got to the heart of the matter by pointing out that political lobbying has a collective-action problem--it's tempting to let another peanut farmer do the lobbying and work because you might get the benefits, anyway. Smaller groups find it easier to overcome this problem, as Warren argues:
The smaller the collective action group, the more likely that the group will be able to overcome the collective action problem. (1) Because in a smaller group it is easier to monitor as to whether or not people are able to be free-riders and to then introduce some kind of mechanism to encourage them to join the collective enterprise. And (2) smaller groups will find it easier to organize politically. The farming lobby, being very small in proportion to the public as a whole, are much easier to organize politically than the whole public. Therefore, the farming lobby is able to impose negative externalities on the general population at large. We have a government failure generated by structural incentives within the political process.
The only thing missing here is the relevant jargon, which is "transaction costs." Smaller groups have lower transaction costs and while they may have fewer resources than larger groups, their incentives to employ those resources politically and their ability to encourage the employment of those resources politically are larger than for small groups. To take a simple example, crop insurance of $20 billion per year costs the average American about $60. That amount is so small that most Americans are unaware of it. And if you are aware of it, how much time are you willing to spend to stop that from happening? Not so much. It's just not worth it. But if you are a farmer who gets tens of thousands of dollars from the program, you will be very interested in the program, eager to help politicians who implement the program, and eager to coordinate with your fellow farmers to make it happen. From the New Republic summary of the most recent farm bill:
Referring to beneficiaries as "farmers" underplays how giant agribusinesses really benefit from subsidized crop insurance. There have traditionally been no limits to premium support, meaning the richest businesses reap the most benefits. A provision from Sen. Tom Coburn to reduce payouts for farmers with over $750,000 in income was stripped from the final bill, despite passing the Senate twice. The Environmental Working Group, a critic of crop insurance, estimates that 10,000 policyholders receive over $100,000 a year in subsidies annually, with some receiving over $1 million, while the bottom 80 percent of farmers, the mom-and-pop operations, collect only $5,000 annually. These are educated guesses, because under current law, the names of individual businesses receiving support are kept secret, a provision maintained in the new farm bill. The House version included a measure that would disclose which members of Congress receive subsidies, but that was dropped.

So congrats to Rick Groves and to Warren for doing an excellent job.

CATEGORIES: Agriculture , Extras

   

This week, Roberts spoke with agriculture & resource economist Daniel Sumner on the history, winners, and losers of U.S. agricultural subsidies from the New Deal to today. Now we'd like to go deeper and see what you took from this week's conversation.

Choose one of the questions below and submit your response (250 words or less, please) via email to mail@econtalk.org by midnight on Sunday, February 15. Put "Sumner Extra" in the subject line. We'll post some of your responses at EconTalk so we can continue the conversation.

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CATEGORIES: Agriculture , Extras

   

This week, we want to further the learning associated with Alex Tabarrok on Private Cities. We can learn a lot from one another.

So this week, choose from one of the prompts below the fold, and post your reply (250 words or less, please!) in the comments. We'll highlight some of our favorites (and maybe even send some surprises your way). We also hope you'll comment on each others' replies.

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Nassim Taleb returned to EconTalk this week, to discuss his recent paper on the risks inherent in genetically modified organisms. Contra last week's guest, Greg Page, Taleb sees the potential for global ruin in GMOS.

Share your reactions to the following prompts with us, and let's continue the conversation.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

Greg Page, former CEO of Cargill spoke with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what it's like to run a global food company and issues affecting world food markets.

Here's your chance to test your knowledge and share your answers to questions from this week's conversation.

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This week, Joshua Greene of Harvard University and author of Moral Tribes spoke with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about moral dilemmas and what Greene calls the tragedy of common-sense morality.

What did you think of this week's conversation? Use the prompts below to share your thoughts. As always, we love to hear from you.

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This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomed author James Tooley to talk about what he discovered in researching the educational options of the world's poorest children. What he found is surprising to many, but as Roberts notes, some find Tooley's work dangerous. Let us know what you think about their conversation, using the prompts in this week's Extra.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Education , Extras

   

This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts explored his skepticism about econometrics and causation with MIT's Joshua Angrist. Did Angrist convince Roberts about the value of empirical methods today? Are you convinced?

We want to hear what you think...

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CATEGORIES: Books , Data and Evidence , Extras

   

In this week's episode, EconTalk host Russ Roberts talks with James Otteson about socialism and capitalism, touching on camping, G.A. Cohen, Adam Smith, and education along the way.

Use the questions below to check your knowledge or respond. As always, we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Extras

   

Bostrom follow-up

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

Bostrom Follow-up

For me, the interview with Nick Bostrom was mind-blowing. I've been thinking about it quite a bit since we did the interview and the thoughtful comments from listeners have continued the process.

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Nick Bostrom

   

In this week's futuristic episode, Roberts chatted with philosopher Nick Bostrom on the promises and potential dangers of superintelligence, smart machines which he believes will be able to radically outperform humans in the future.

Are you as concerned as Bostrom about these supermachines? Do you share Roberts' skepticism about their danger? Wherever you fall, share your thoughts with us in the comments. As always, we love to hear from you.

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EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomes back University of Chicago's Emily Oster in this week's episode, in which they discuss the differences in infant mortality rates across nations, as well as the challenges and opportunities afforded by health data.

Share your thoughts on this week's conversation by responding to any or all of the questions below in the comments. We love to hear from you!

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Health

   

This week's EconTalk episode with Vernon Smith helped me understand something that has been bothering me for a long time.

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CATEGORIES: Adam Smith , Extras

   

Nobel laureate Vernon Smith joins EconTalk host Russ Roberts this week on EconTalk to discuss Adam Smith's approach to economics and human behavior.

And now we'd like to hear from you...Use the prompts below to share your reactions to this week's conversation in the comments. Or use them to start your own face-to-face conversations, and let us know how it goes.

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Thinking About Health... An EconTalk Playlist

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

We hope your thinking about the economics of the end of life were challenged in this week's episode with palliative care physician Becky Liddicoat Yamarik.

We've taking a slightly different direction in this Extra...We're pleased to introduce our first EconTalk Playlist, along with some prompts for thinking about the economics of health and health care. If the Yamarik episode intrigued you, too, we hope you'll enjoy visiting (or revisiting!) these past health-related episodes.

We hope you enjoy it, and as always, we love to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the comments, or start your own conversations offline.

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Health

   

Russ Roberts welcomed MIT's Daron Acemoglu back to EconTalk this week, in an episode focused on the interplay between institutions and inequality.

Now it's your turn...Use the prompts below and share your reactions in the comments. If you use the prompts elsewhere (in a class, at the dinner table or a cocktail party), we'd love to hear about that, too.

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Income Inequality

   

Nobel laureate and emeritus professor at MIT Robert Solow sat down with EconTalk host Russ Roberts this week to discuss growth theory and the challenges of macroeconomics.

Now let's hear from you. Use the prompts below for comments here at EconTalk, or use them to start your own conversations offline. We love to hear from you.


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There's a new sheriff in town!This week, there was a new sheriff in town! Russ Roberts was the guest in this week's episode, while EconTalk fave Mike Munger stood in as interviewer. The subject was Roberts's new book, How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life. Whether your life changes have already happened or are still pending, we want to hear from you.

Use the prompts below to share your thoughts in the comments, use them as a classroom assignment, or use them to spark conversation at a cocktail party. But do let us know your thoughts; we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Adam Smith , Books , Extras

   

Are you concerned that robots will take your job? Could you write out complete instructions for riding a bike? This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts explored these questions and more with MIT's David Autor. Now we'd like to hear from you.

Please use the questions below as prompts for the comments section. Or use them in your offline interactions. Either way, we're anxious to broaden the conversation. We love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts talked with Thomas Piketty, author of the controversial and best-selling tome, Capital in the 21st Century.

As always, we'd like to hear your thoughts on this episode. Use the prompts below and share in the comments section, or use them to prompt discussion offline. Either way, we know you have something to say, and we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Extras , Income Inequality

   

In this week's episode, EconTalk host Russ Roberts spoke with education journalist Elizabeth Green about her new book, Building a Better Teacher. Their conversation covers teaching as a craft, the role and history of schools of education, and the efficacy of various education reforms.

Now we'd like to hear your reaction to this week's conversation. Reply to the prompts below in the comments, or use them to spark your own conversation offline. And let us know how it goes...As always, we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Books , Education , Extras

   

This week, Russ Roberts chatted with former Stanford professor and Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller about the present and future of online education.

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We'd like to hear your thoughts about blended learning and/or online education. Use the prompts below and post your response in the comments, or start your own conversation offline and let us know how it goes. We love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Education , Extras

   

This week Roberts discussed free-market environmentalism with Terry Anderson, of the Property and Environment Research Center and the Hoover Institution.

FME's unique combination of free-market principles and environmental stewardship may not be as radical as when it was introduced, yet still is not mainstream. Let us know your thoughts on its potential. We hope you find the prompts below useful. As always, we love to hear from you!

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This week, Roberts returned to a political-economy topic, law, with guest Barry Weingast of Stanford.

As always, we'd like to hear what you thought. So use the prompts below to share your thoughts and spark some conversation.

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This week's episode featured two guests, Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha of LinkedIn and co-authors of The Alliance and The Start-Up of You.

Whether you're looking to improve your own employment prospects, build a better team at work, or interested in the newest in tech and V.C., we'd love to hear from you. Use the prompts below the fold to join the conversation in this forum, or start your own conversation offline, and let us know how it goes.

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This week, Russ Roberts spoke with Y Combinator president Sam Altman about tech, innovation, Y Combinator's impact, and more.

Share your thoughts on this week's episode, exploring the prompts below. Or pose your own question(s) for conversation. Either way, we love to hear from you.

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Roberts returns to the topic of development this week in his conversation with Columbia's Chris Blattman, advocate of a radical approach to fighting poverty.

Share YOUR thoughts on this week's episode...Join the conversation in the comments, or start your own offline. We love to hear from you!

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

This week, Russ welcomed back Mike Munger for his 26th appearance on EconTalk! Their topic of conversation- the rise of the sharing economy.

We're interested in your experiences in the sharing economy, as well as your reaction to our Extra prompts this week. Respond to them here at EconTalk, start a conversation over dinner...it's up to you. As always, we love to hear from you.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

In this week's episode, Roberts talks about risk and uncertainty with 2013 Nobel laureate, Lars Peter Hansen.

What are your thoughts on this topic? Use the prompts below the fold to join our conversation online, or start your own offline. Let us know what you think. We love to hear from you!

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Again, I want to thank everyone who responded to the Easterly Essay questions I asked. The last question was:

Roberts challenges Easterly to respond to those who claim that Finland in education or China in economic growth are models that policymakers should emulate. What is the strongest version of this claim that Roberts provides? How would you respond?

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Growth

   

In the Easterly Essay questions I asked:

What role can (and should) data play in development? How does Easterly answer this question? How would Jeffrey Sachs answer this question? Morten Jerven discusses the quality of data collected by African nations in this 2013 episode. Given some of these challenges, how should Easterly and Sachs revise their approaches?

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CATEGORIES: Data and Evidence , Extras , Growth

   

The Best Easterly Essays

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

I want to thank the people (39 in all) who submitted essays in response to the questions I posed about the Easterly episode. I thought the best essays were submitted by Luke Edwards, Conor Lennon, Alex Ruch, and Michael Tew. Their essays will be posted here over the next few days. Please comment on their essays and watch this space for another opportunity to write for EconTalk.

CATEGORIES: Extras

   

This week, Roberts spoke with Gregory Zuckerman about his new book, The Frackers, and the renaissance of energy production in the United States.

Use the prompts behind the fold to encourage conversation, either online or off. As always, we love to hear from you!

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CATEGORIES: Books , Environment , Extras

   

A Chance to Write for EconTalk!

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

In this week's episode, Roberts talks "The Tyranny of Experts" with guest William Easterly.

For this week's Extra, we thought we'd change things up a bit...

Choose one of the four questions (below the fold) and compose an answer of 600 words or less. Send it to mail@econtalk.org by midnight Sunday June 22. Put "Easterly Essay" in the subject line. Selected entries chosen by Roberts will be posted the following week on EconTalk.org, and the authors will receive a complimentary Liberty Fund book.

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Becker Postmortem

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

In this week's episode, Roberts and Edward Lazear share their recollections of recently deceased Nobel laureate Gary Becker. We'd like to hear what you think of Becker's work, and encourage you to join the conversation.

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CATEGORIES: Extras , Nobel Prize Winners

   

This week's EconTalk was a live episode.

Share these prompts with your friends, family, students, co-workers, and let us know how the conversation goes! We love to hear from you.

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Yuval Levin Postmortem

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

I want to respond to a number of interesting comments and add some thoughts on the episode with Yuval Levin.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

The origins of the Left-Right divide in American politics is the primary focus of this week's episode.

Consider the prompts below, and let's continue the conversation.

Keep reading:

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

Marc Andreessen Postmortem

EconTalk Extra
by Russ Roberts

This week's interview with Marc Andreessen was one of my favorite episodes in a while.

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CATEGORIES: Extras

   

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