Russ Roberts

August 2017

A Monthly Archive (8 entries)
 

Where has all the Parking Gone?

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

garage.jpg What will the cars of the future look like? Will they resemble the teacups at Disneyland? How long will it take us to stop referring to "driving" when humans no longer do? (Think about how seldom you use your phone to "phone" someone...) And what will be the fate of all the parking lots and garages of today? Will they be used for other purposes or replaced entirely?

These are just some of the questions that come up in this week's EconTalk episode with Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz. Evans suggests that we have a difficult time making predictions about the future when we extrapolate from that with which we're familiar today. But let's give it a shot...We always love to hear your thoughts.

1. As we move from the cars of today to autonomous (Evans dislikes the term "driverless") vehicles, which elements will become more expensive and which less expensive? Which complementary industries will be most affected, and why?

CONTINUE READING...




Podcast episode Benedict Evans on the Future of Cars

EconTalk Episode with Benedict Evans
Hosted by Russ Roberts

driverless%20cars.jpg Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about two important trends for the future of personal travel--the increasing number of electric cars and a world of autonomous vehicles. Evans talks about how these two trends are likely to continue and the implications for the economy, urban design, and how we live.

Size:30.9 MB
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paper TOWELS or PAPER towels

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

paper towels.jpg Emergent order has long been a common EconTalk theme, and this week's fascinating episode is no exception. This week, host Russ Roberts welcomed Columbia University linguist John McWhorter to the program to discuss the evolution of language and his new book, Words on the Move. Language as an emergent order has also long been a theme of political economy, but McWhorter's engaging examples and explanations breathe new life into the subject. It's a must listen (and I mean listen, as you'll miss a tremendous amount of auditory nuance.) For example, is it paper TOWELS, or PAPER towels? BLACKboard or blackBOARD? Let us know your thoughts today!

1. Let's start with perhaps the most controversial question... Should we re-word Shakespeare for the modern audience? Why or why not?


CONTINUE READING...

CATEGORIES: Books , Extras



Podcast episode John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move

EconTalk Episode with John McWhorter
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Words%20on%20the%20Move.jpg How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.

Size:29.7 MB
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Soul in the Game

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

circuit breaker.jpg EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomes back popular guest Nassim Nicholas Taleb in this week's episode to chat about the manuscript of his forthcoming book, Skin in the Game. In their wide-ranging conversation, the discuss the value of employees versus slaves, the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards to work, and the power of minorities. Even though Taleb counsels listeners to beware of "good advice," trust us...take ours and have a listen!

We'd love to get your reactions to this week's episode, so please share with us today. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. Why does Taleb think we are more "slave-burdened" today than in the past? To what extent do you agree with him?

CONTINUE READING...

CATEGORIES: Extras



Podcast episode Nassim Nicholas Taleb on Work, Slavery, the Minority Rule, and Skin in the Game

EconTalk Episode with Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Hosted by Russ Roberts

NassimNicholasTaleb.png Nassim Nicholas Taleb talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the manuscript version of his forthcoming book, Skin in the Game. Topics discussed include the role of skin in the game in labor markets, the power of minorities, the Lindy effect, Taleb's blind spots and regrets, and the politics of globalization.

Size:38.8 MB
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Movin' on up?

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

moving.jpg What's the key to maintaining civilization and promoting human well-being? Tyler Cowen thinks he knows the answer, and that we've had it all along. Host Russ Roberts welcomes Cowen back this week for his tenth appearance to discuss his recently released "Stubborn Attachments" on Medium.

As usual, now we'd like to hear what you thought about this week's conversation. So please take a few moments and share your thoughts below...We love to hear from you!

1. Do people today have less willingness to sacrifice for future generations than their predecessors? That is, are we more complacent? If yes, why do you believe that be to the case? If not, what evidence can you cite that suggests this to be untrue?

CONTINUE READING...

CATEGORIES: Extras



Podcast episode Tyler Cowen on Stubborn Attachments, Prosperity, and the Good Society

EconTalk Episode with Tyler Cowen
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Stubborn%20Attachments.png Tyler Cowen of George Mason University and the co-host of the blog Marginal Revolution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Stubborn Attachments, his book-length treatment of how to think about public policy. Cowen argues that economic growth--properly defined--is the moral key to maintaining civilization and promoting human well-being. Along the way, the conversation also deals with inequality, environmental issues, and education.

Size:27.9 MB
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