Russ Roberts

October 2016

A Monthly Archive (8 entries)
 

Podcast episode Judith Donath on Signaling, Design, and the Social Machine

EconTalk Episode with Judith Donath
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Social%20Machine.jpg Judith Donath, author of The Social Machine, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book--an examination of signaling, online identity, and online community. Donath argues that design elements in technology play a key role in our interactions with one another. The conversation closes with a discussion of data collection by corporations and the government.

Size:31.3 MB
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Freedom (and Free Beer) Tomorrow

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

Che in Cuba.jpg What's it really like to live in communist Cuba today? In this week's episode, host Russ Roberts welcomes back the University of Chicago's Casey Mulligan, who recently returned from a week-long trip there. Mulligan's observations on the current state of the Cuban people, as well as his optimism for their future, made for fascinating conversation, and left me with lots to think about.

Now it's your turn...What's the promise of freedom for Cubans today? Is it merely a dream that's always just around the corner, or will the Castro regime continue to allow for change in the form of less state control? Have you ever been to Cuba? If so, how does your experience compare to Mulligan's?

1. Mulligan has a lot to say about the differences he perceived between Cuban-Americans and "Cuban-Cubans." What are some of these differences, and what does Mulligan believe accounts for them? What do you think such differences suggest?

CONTINUE READING...




Podcast episode Casey Mulligan on Cuba

EconTalk Episode with Casey Mulligan
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Cuba.jpg Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about life in Cuba. Mulligan, who recently returned from a trip to Cuba, discusses the economy, the standard of living and some of the peculiarities of communist control.

Size:28.4 MB
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Podcast episode Chris Arnade on the Mexican Crisis, TARP, and American Poverty

EconTalk Episode with Chris Arnade
Hosted by Russ Roberts

bailout.jpg Chris Arnade, former Wall Street trader turned photographer and social chronicler, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what he learned from the front lines of the financial industry in the 1990s and 2000s when everything slowly and then very quickly began to fall apart. He also discusses his transition into observer and photographer of drug addicts, the poor, and the forgotten parts of America.

Size:31.7 MB
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How Poor is Poor?

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis
pinky.jpg Should economists rethink the widely held view that redistribution from rich nations to poor nations makes the world a better place? 2015 Nobel laureate Sir Angus Deaton thinks so. That's the topic of conversation in this week's EconTalk episode.

So are you a cosmopolitan prioritarianist? A try-it-out-atarianist? Do you feel more sympathy for your fellow countrymen or those in the poorest parts of the world? As always, we'd love to see your response to this week's conversation...Let's continue it here.

1. Why does Deaton think making the claim that everyone is better off as a result of trade and globalization is "intellectual hucksterism," and to what extent do you agree?

CONTINUE READING...

CATEGORIES: Extras



Podcast episode Angus Deaton on Inequality, Trade, and the Robin Hood Principle

EconTalk Episode with Angus Deaton
Hosted by Russ Roberts

robin%20hood.jpg Nobel Laureate in Economics Angus Deaton of Princeton University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the economics of trade and aid. Deaton wonders if economists should re-think the widely-held view that redistribution from rich nations to poor nations makes the world a better place. The conversation focuses on the challenges facing poor Americans including the rising mortality rate for white Americans ages 45-54.

Size:29.9 MB
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Is Big Data Your Frenemy?

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

accuracy.jpg In this week's EconTalk episode, host Russ Roberts welcomes back Cathy O'Neil, author of the fantastically titled new book, Weapons of Math Destruction. The "weapons" O'Neil is concerned with are problematic algorithms- widespread, in some sense secret or proprietary, and in some way destructive. While Roberts and O'Neil agree about the dangers inherent in certain algorithmic applications, they disagree on many as well.

So let's hear your thoughts on the issues in this week's conversation. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. How does the use of recidivism risk scores "create its own reality" in criminal sentencing? According to O'Neil, how does this practice confuse accuracy with causality?

CONTINUE READING...

CATEGORIES: Books , Data and Evidence , Extras



Podcast episode Cathy O'Neil on Weapons of Math Destruction

EconTalk Episode with Cathy O'Neil
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Math%20Destruction.jpg Cathy O'Neil, data scientist and author of Weapons of Math Destruction talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book. O'Neil argues that the commercial application of big data often harms individuals in unknown ways. She argues that the poor are particularly vulnerable to exploitation. Examples discussed include prison sentencing, college rankings, evaluations of teachers, and targeted advertising. O'Neil argues for more transparency and ethical standards when using data.

Size: 32.6 MB
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